Blog

Crafting a Parenting Plan that Works

Posted by Joseph D. Lento | Aug 20, 2019 | 0 Comments

Raising children takes a tremendous amount of patience, time, and dedication. Most couples are thankful that they have each other to lean on when rearing children, especially in the event that serious issues arise. But when things go awry in the relationship, and both parents still want to remain involved in their child's life, parenting must be approached differently. 

Divorce forces parents to identify and protect their own parental interests, instead of thinking of the best interest of the family as a whole. Separate living arrangements and contentious relationships between parents drastically change the dynamics of relationships. This is why a thorough, well-thought-out parenting plan can help parents remain effective through tumultuous times.

Parenting plans are court-ordered agreements created and negotiated by divorcing spouses. Without the help of an attorney, many parents end up drafting a bare-bones parenting plan that causes the children to suffer. Some children ultimately end up missing out on time with either parent, their grandparents, and other extended family. They may also miss out on the medical care they need due to vague provisions or missing details in the parenting plan. 

What Goes Into an Effective Parenting Plan?

In order to create an effective parenting plan, parents must openly discuss the most important facets of their respective parental responsibilities as well as what is in the child's best interest. These plans are extremely detailed and should cover everything from who will be tasked with making primary decisions, to how serious issues should be resolved if they ever arise. Here are some key factors that should be accounted for in your parenting plan:

  • The child's age and maturity
  • Each parent's work schedule
  • The distance between both parent's homes
  • The child's daycare and school schedule
  • The developmental, medical or social needs for each child
  • Holiday traditions as celebrated prior to separation
  • The quantity of care by each parent prior to separation etc.

What Should Your Goals Be?

A thorough parenting plan will include goals that, when achieved, will fulfill the emotional and physical needs of your children as they navigate this new arrangement. Most parents gauge “success” by how smooth day-to-day decisions and interactions are, and how rare instances of frustration and miscommunication become.  In order for a parenting plan to be deemed effective, consider the following four goals:

  1. Maximum time is spent with both parents, as well as extended family
  2. Allow space for adaptability to the parenting plan to suit everybody involved
  3. All milestones include the presence of both parents
  4. Minimize the loss of an already established routine (hobbies, friends, extracurriculars, traditions, etc.)

Creating an effective parenting plan can save you time and money down the line, so it's important that it's done right the first time. If you obtain the help of an attorney, a plan can also spare you time in court.

New Jersey Family Law Attorney

Create a solid parenting plan with the help of New Jersey family law attorney Joseph D. Lento. Schedule a consultation today online or by phone at 888-535-3686.

About the Author

Joseph D. Lento

"I pride myself on having heart and driving hard to get results!" Joseph D. Lento has more than a decade of experience advocating for his Family Law clients in courtrooms in New Jersey as well as Pennsylvania. He does not settle for the easiest outcome, and instead prioritizes his clients' needs and protects their interests.

Comments

There are no comments for this post. Be the first and Add your Comment below.

Leave a Comment

Contact a Family Law Attorney Today!

Slide3

Attorney Joseph D. Lento has more than a decade of experience practicing Family Law in New Jersey. If you are having any uncertainties about what the future may hold for you and your family, contact our offices today. Family Law Attorney Joseph Lento will go above and beyond the needs for any client and fight for what is fair.

This website was created only for general information purposes. It is not intended to be construed as legal advice for any situation. Only a direct consultation with a licensed Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York attorney can provide you with formal legal counsel based on the unique details surrounding your situation. The pages on this website may contain links and contact information for third party organizations – the Lento Law Firm does not necessarily endorse these organizations nor the materials contained on their website. In Pennsylvania, Attorney Joseph D. Lento represents clients throughout Pennsylvania's 67 counties, including, but not limited to Philadelphia, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Berks, Lancaster, Lehigh, and Northampton County. In New Jersey, attorney Joseph D. Lento represents clients throughout New Jersey's 21 counties: Atlantic, Bergen, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Salem, Somerset, Sussex, Union, and Warren County, In New York, Attorney Joseph D. Lento represents clients throughout New York's 62 counties. Outside of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, unless attorney Joseph D. Lento is admitted pro hac vice if needed, his assistance may not constitute legal advice or the practice of law. The decision to hire an attorney in Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania counties, New Jersey, New York, or nationwide should not be made solely on the strength of an advertisement. We invite you to contact the Lento Law Firm directly to inquire about our specific qualifications and experience. Communicating with the Lento Law Firm by email, phone, or fax does not create an attorney-client relationship. The Lento Law Firm will serve as your official legal counsel upon a formal agreement from both parties. Any information sent to the Lento Law Firm before an attorney-client relationship is made is done on a non-confidential basis.

Menu